Mrs. Chan

Archive for the ‘Pork Dishes’ Category

Guest Chef: Braised Pork Belly by Irene Ngoh

In Guest Chef, Pork Dishes on August 12, 2011 at 9:14 pm

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Irene promised us her famous home recipe, Hokkien Braised Duck. Unfortunately, that particular Saturday Mr. Quaky was not seen at the Happy Garden market. As she had shared with me earlier, this very useful recipe is very adaptable for all kinds of meat like pork or even chicken; either whole or parts like wings or thighs. She adapted.

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She chose the best part of the pig, the secret pork belly. When choosing, one can either select the slim waist that consists very lean meat or the sinfully layered ones with more fats. The Chans prefer the slightly fatter part for braising. You can consume it with less guilt as the long braising over medium to low heat would have drawn most of the lard out. The result, a deliciously honeyed braised meat so tender it almost melt in your mouth.

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Irene’s recipe has very few ingredients and very simple steps. I am not a big fan of anise and 5 spice powder; like most kids. I just love the simple taste and I am certain children would welcome a braised chicken wings or drumsticks using this recipe.

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BRAISED PORK BELLY

INGREDIENTS:-

  • 1.5 kilogram of secret port belly of your choice
  • 8 tablespoon of sugar
  • 5 tablespoon of cooking oil
  • 1 bulb of garlic, coarsely minced
  • 1 tablespoon of light soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • water
METHOD:-
  1. Wash and cut pork into strips of desired width. Wipe dry.
  2. In a wide deep wok, put in oil when wok is hot.
  3. Add in the sugar, cook till melted.
  4. When sugar starts to caramelise and bubble, put in the strips of pork belly.
  5. Stir and cook for about 10 minutes making sure that all pieces are properly coated.
  6. Pour in just enough water so that all meat is in a pool of it.
  7. Add light soy sauce and salt.
  8. On medium heat, cover the wok and cook for 30 minutes. Stirring and turning the strips.
  9. When stock is reduced into a thick golden honey gravy

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Guest Chef: Egg Benedict by Luke Ding

In Guest Chef, Pork Dishes on July 3, 2011 at 2:37 pm

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Luke and Lisa, are the closest friends Stevie and I shared. Before we were married, we hung around most weekends watching a movie, out for a drink or simple dinner in the city. We married, a couple of months apart and soon to be neighbours. Am looking forward to the proximity, lots of feasting and chilling out again.

Luke, though born in Sitiawan, was brought up in Melbourne Australia since he was 9. A natural in the kitchen, learned culinary art and worked for several years in Atomica Caffe, Melbourne before coming back to Kuala Lumpur. Joint ventured with his brother James and opened Providore, a warm little restaurant tucked in Solaris serving the finest Mediterranean and Italian dishes. It has been a year or so since they have moved on full swing into distributing quality confectionery products in Malaysia.

          

This Saturday, we are opened to surprises. After cooking all weekdays, the Chan’s are eager to host a guest chef to display his culinary skills while we sit back and enjoy a little.

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Overjoyed when Luke disclosed that he was going to cook his signature dish, Egg Benedict. The idea of runny egg yolks served on warmly toasted Thomas English muffins, with a generous helping of hollandaise sauce, warmed our hearts. Luke came with the best ingredients so as not to compromise on the deliverance of a simple but great dish.

Each platter was served with a toasted muffin, cut into half, served open. A twirled, crispy and tasty bacon set on the muffins. Carefully, 2 poached eggs (yes, sinfully indulgent) were laid on top of the bacon. Our Egg Benedict came accompanied with Sautee Mushrooms and Asparagus Spearheads Wrapped in Serrano Ham. Before serving, each dish was drizzle with lots of creamy, eggy hollandaise sauce.

EGG BENEDICT

Recipe for 5 persons

INGREDIENTS:-

  • 10 poached eggs
  • 10 slices of streaky bacon or canadian ham
  • 5 English Muffins
  • Hollandaise Sauce
  • Sauteed Mushroom – optional
  • Serrano Ham Wrapped Asparagus – optional

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POACH EGGS

Method:-
  1. Boil a small pot of water and add in some white vinegar.
  2. Crack an egg a time into a small ball and gently drop into simmering water.
  3. When white is solidify, scoop it out with a ladle.
  4. Do not overcook, a perfect poach egg has runny yolk.

SAUTEE MUSHROOM

INGREDIENTS:-
  • button mushrooms
  • balsamic vinegar
  • rosemary
METHOD:-
  1. Use mushrooms whole or cut into desired size.
  2. After frying bacon, use leftover oil in pan to sautee mushrooms.
  3. Add rosemary and some balsamic vinegar for taste.
  

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE

INGREDIENTS:-
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 stick or 250gm salted butter – melted
METHOD:-
  1. Over bain-marie, combine the egg yolks and white wine vinegar.
  2. Gentle whisk over the bain-marie.
  3. Pour in the melted butter, bit by bit and continue whisking till you get the favoured consistency.
  

SERRANO HAM WRAPPED ASPARAGUS

INGREDIENTS:-
  • serrano ham
  • asparagus spears
METHOD:-
  1. Blanch asparagus in boiling water for a quick one minute.
  2. Drain water and rinse with cold tap water.
  3. Transfer to a grill pan and drizzle some melted butter.
  4. Let cool a little and wrap with ham.

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A fan of english muffins, Agnes is seen hogging some.

  

A western comfort food eaten the kampong style here.

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Yam Rice (Taro Rice) 芋头饭

In Apprentice Chef, Pork Dishes, Snack Food on June 21, 2011 at 9:48 pm

The Chan’s is a typical Chinese household and pork is central to our cuisines so it’s only natural that many of our recipes involve pork.

To our Muslim friends who follow this blog, I would encourage you to try out our recipes by substituting pork with other meats (chicken, duck, or lamb), or even firm tofu/taokua, and voila ….. a whole new world of taste and flavor awaits you!

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Last Sunday, my hubby was craving for his favorite  porky soup and so we headed to a coffee shop in Sungai Way that’s popular for mixed pork & offal soup served with yam (taro root) rice.

I shared a bowl of yam rice with Agnes but found it a letdown. It wasn’t aromatic and I dug and dug, but found no chunky pieces of yam.

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Unsatisfied, I decided to cook some for dinner that very night. There was half a yam left sitting in the fridge since Momsie’s visit. I thought to myself that no matter how badly my yam rice may turn out that night, it wouldn’t be as bad as the one I had that morning.

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At the Chan household, I have learned not to waste food and be creative in dishing out a meal by improvising on what’s available. I checked in the refrigerator and the pantry and discovered I had sufficient ingredients to make a pared-down casserole yam rice.

I chose to use basmathi, when sufficiently soaked it produces very long, fluffy and fragrant rice when cooked. It is not starchy and very suitable for people with bloated stomach problems like Agnes and myself.

Many may choose to add wax sausages, roasted char siew or even dried shrimps, but I decided otherwise.

My yam rice here has very few ingredients, to ensure the clarity of flavour. Only the rice,  yam, and the pork should take centre stage.

Yam rice is often served with porky soup, and sometimes, a sambal.

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Recipe For Yam Rice

INGREDIENTS:-
(serves 3-4)

  • 1 cup (200 gm) uncooked basmati rice wash, rinse and soak for 20 mins
  • 1 cup of water to cook rice
  • 200 gm yam (taro), remove skin and cube
  • dried shiitake mushrooms soaked in water for 15 minutes, drain the water for use later and slice or cube fungi
  • 100 gm pork belly cut to small pieces, marinate with a little oil, soya sauce and dash of pepper
  • salt to taste
  • dash of ground white pepper
  • 2 tbsp olive oil or vegetable oil

Seasonings

  •  3/4 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 tsp dark soy sauce
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
Garnishing
  • spring onions
  • fried shallots

METHOD:-

  1. Heat a wok or in my cast a cast iron pot and pour 2 tablespoon oil to fry shallots till golden brown. Scoop up for garnishing.
  2. Remaining oil use to stir fry yam cubes on high heat for roughly 5 minutes till just about cooked. Set aside.
  3. Using the remaining oil in the wok, stir meat and mushrooms on medium low heat till fragrant (about 2-3 minutes).
  4. Return the cooked yam to the wok. Add rice and fry for 1-2 minutes till all the ingredients are well mixed.
  5. Add water to cook rice followed by seasonings. Stir to make sure that the seasonings are well mixed.
  6. Boil the rice mixture for roughly 20 minutes, or till the water has evaporated and the rice is fully cooked and puffy.
  7. Garnish with fried shallots and spring onions.

Rice Porridge

In Labour of Love, Pork Dishes, Snack Food on May 22, 2011 at 11:26 pm

Chinese rice porridge is such a versatile dish. You need very few ingredients to get it going. Primarily, you need a great stock, rice grains and whatever meat or seafood that you have parked in the refrigerator. If those aren’t available, you can dish out a plain porridge and eat them with side condiments like fried peanuts, anchovies, fermented tofu etc.

I have been unwell lately. All the medication and especially the antibiotics, leave me with a very flat taste bud. I welcome the idea to a soupy rice broth that would wash down this stubborn discomfort at the throat.

But then, Chinese porridge can be tricky in dishing out too.

Momsie and Stevie both cooked me pork porridge for my breakfast and dinner consecutively. Both used similar ingredients for the porridge but the outcome on the texture, flavour and consistency of porridge differ vastly. The amount of water and rice ratio, the length of time to cook and when ingredients are dropped into the broth can totally affect the porridge quality and presentation.

Therefore, you can find many variations of rice porridge such as teowchew or hokkien style that has more rice texture and more soupy broth; whereas the cantonese version, congee that is cooked with more water for a longer time until it forms a sticky texture.

MOMSIE’S TEOWCHEW RICE PORRIDGE

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This teowchew version is my favourite for breakfast or lunch. It is not so filling and yet you get great satisfaction of consuming a big bowl of soup. Doesn’t stuff you up, totally light and easy.

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We eat very simple in this household. The Chan loves clarity. Notice that there aren’t any fried shallots, julienne ginger or sesame seed oil? Of course, it is definitely permissible, as it adds aroma and flavour.

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INGRIDIENTS:-

  • rice
  • lean pork sliced (can be replaced with fish or chicken)
  • tian jin dried vegetables
  • stock
  • cilantro
  • salt
  • fermented tofu (optional as a side dish)
METHOD
  1. Put rice and stock to boil.
  2. Place in tian jin fried vegetables the moment the rice is cooked.
  3. You can season a little salt and pepper to the sliced meat before putting into the rice broth.
  4. Boil till meat is cooked and add salt to taste.
  5. Pour into a serving boil garnished with cilantro.
STEVIE CHAN’S PORK CONGEE

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Stevie chosen the best cut of belly pork for me. Good to have these layers of fat and meat.

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Pork belly gives better texture to minced meat. The interlace of lard and meat keeps the paste moist when cooking.

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Hubby only use the best ingredients.

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You will notice that the main ingredients for both porridge and congee is the same. However, due to the treatment and cooking method, the outcome is different.
Stevie’s congee gives a warmer and fuller body. The minced meat gives the feeling that every spoonful is laced with bites. I would prefer this kind of texture for a colder evening and for dinner as they tend to give you a feeling of a more filling dish.
INGREDIENTS:-
  • rice
  • meat minced ( can be replaced with chicken or fish)
  • tian jin dried vegetable
  • stock
  • cilantro
  • sea salt
  • olive oil
  • light soya sauce (optional)
METHOD
  1. Rub olive oil and salt to rice, process believed to make a smoother congee paste. Leave for 10 minutes.
  2. Pour stock and add tian jin dried vegetable to the pot with rice.
  3. Put in minced meat.
  4. Boil for 20 to 30 minutes until you get a sticky congee whereby rice grain is quite broken down
  5. Pour into a serving boil garnished with cilantro.

Kee Heong Bakuteh 奇香肉骨茶

In Amateur Cook, family festivities, Labour of Love, Pork Dishes on May 20, 2011 at 8:59 pm

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My master, my chef, Mr. Stevie Chan.

He is an ardent home entertainer, or should I say great host to family parties. Loves cooking for immediate family members and close friends. Cooking at another’s kitchen can be stressful and difficult. Ingredients and utensils are alway not perfect as you needed them be, moreover you will be so conscious of the fact that you are actually invading someone else’s “important” place.

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As some of you already know, Stevie and I are in the midst of getting our matrimonial home in order. Bought the place before we wed and now we have been living like nomads in between residences of  Agnes and my Mom. It is moving well and we hope to be hosting many a great home parties for closed buddies and relatives. Pickyin a great food blogger from Singapore has booked to come and stay over to give me tuition on cooking and baking tips. I smell great feast and festivities!

Bakuteh, is a very difficult dish. You can asked around, what and how people like their BKT. Trust me, you get very funny and personal comments. I am an almost expert on BKT as I was brought up eating BKT for breakfast everyday before my dad dropped me off to school in Ulu Kepong in the 1970s.Then. in the 1980s we travelled slightly further to Klang and Imbi, venturing beyond in search for finer concoction and presentation of BKT.

I am quite open to the choices offered, I fancy the pig trotter braised in dark soya sauce, pork intestines and stomach, or the big bone/small bone delicacy, or a casserole pot of assorted meats and additional garnish of straw mushrooms, bean curd sheet, mushrooms, fried fritters/yau char kueh etc. You are spoilt for choice and there rightfully will be one that match your taste bud.

Bakuteh, truly a personal dish, one man’s meat can be another’s poison.

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Tofu a very complimentary stuff that goes well with casserole pot BKT. Choose the best, from Bukit Tinggi or Bentong.

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Our honored guests tonight is a very beautiful and soulful couple, Lam Yuet and hubby, Jian Quiang. Behind the cooking counter, Stevie is pretty stressed out because Jian Quiang comes from Klang and an expert on BKT and tea. Apologetic as well because, we chosen to take a short cut to use a very good ready mixed BKT herbal sachet from Kee Heong. Anyway, what matters is, Stevie is a very serious cook and makes sure he has the best ingredients.

While cooking we were reminiscing the last trip up to Ah Her’s at Pandamaran, Klang, recommended and treated by Jian Quiang. It was the best BKT we ever tasted, nowhere else in the world you can find another match. The consistency, the texture and flavour; immaculate and just right.

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Coco Chan, the youngest sibling of Stevie, sharing a light moment with hubby.

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Sol looking good at 6 months.

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Home parties are so warm and fun.

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My 3 choice recommendations for BKT is as follows:-

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Kee Heong Bakuteh 奇香肉骨茶

INGREDIENTS:-

  • 1 kilo of meat, ideally secret pork belly and soft spareribs (for halal substitute with chicken) Do Not cut meat into bite size.
  • 2 packet of Kee Heong Bakuteh Sachet
  • 4 big whole pulps of garlic with skin
  • kei chee, dangguai, huaishan, pakkei (optional)
  • whole bean curds and deep fried tofus
  • mushrooms
  • dark and lite soya sauce
  • salt
METHOD:-
  1. bring 3 liters of water to boil, add both dark and light soy sauces, whole garlic, whole meat and spareribs, and Kee Heong BKT herb sachets,
  2. boil for 10 minutes, turn fire to low setting,
  3. after 30 minutes, add whole deep fired tofus and whole bean curds,
  4. simmer for another 30 minutes
  5. cut into smaller bite size the meat to be served
  6. serve mushrooms, bean curds and deep fried tofus into smaller bowls as side dish (optional)

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